Kata originally were teaching and training methods by which successful combat techniques were preserved and passed on. The basic goal of kata is to preserve and transmit proven techniques and to practice self-defence. By practicing in a repetitive manner the learner develops the ability to execute those techniques and movements in a natural, reflex-like manner. View Karate Kata ( 型 ) »

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Nijūshiho ( 二十四歩 )

(Japanese: Twenty four steps) is an advanced kata practiced in Shotokan,Shitoryo and Wadō-ryū karate


The origin of Nijūshiho is unknown, but it is presumed that it originates from the Aragaki group like Sochin and others. this is shown through the similarity to Unsu. In introducing karate from Okinawa to Japan, Gichin Funakoshi changed the name of the kata from Niseishi to Nijūshiho. Both names mean "24 steps."

This kata is also practiced in Tang Soo Do and is called E Sip Sa Bo in Korean. Due to its difficulty, this kata is often reserved for advanced black belt level students. Like its Japanese and Okinawan counterparts E Sip Sa Bo also translates to “24 steps.”

Did you know?

Ganbaru (頑張る lit., stand firm), also romanized as gambaru, is a ubiquitous Japanese word which roughly means to slog on tenaciously through tough times. The word Ganbaru is often translated to mean "doing one’s best", but in practice, it means doing more than one's best. The word emphasizes "working with perseverance" or "toughing it out." Ganbaru means "to commit oneself fully to a task and to bring that task to an end." It can be translated to mean persistence, tenacity, doggedness and hard work. The term has a unique importance in Japanese culture.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Ganbaru", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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This article uses material from the Wikipedia articles "Nijūshiho", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

 

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